KC Trommer

Sylvie Rosokoff, Photographer

KC Trommer is the author of We Call Them Beautiful (Diode Editions, 2019), as well as the chapbook The Hasp Tongue (dancing girl press, 2014). A graduate of the MFA program at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, she has been the recipient of an Academy of American Poets Prize and her poem “Fear Not, Mary” won the 2015 Fugue Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in AGNI, The Antioch Review, Blackbird, Octopus, The Sycamore Review, Prairie Schooner, Poetry East, and in the anthologies Resist Much, Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance (Spuyten Duyvil, 2017) and Who Will Speak for America? (Temple University Press, 2018). She is the curator of the online audio project QUEENSBOUND. You can find her at kctrommer.com.

Further Reading

Press

Reviews



Interviews & Features










Awards & Honors






  • Finalist: 2017 BOAAT Poetry Prize (Dean Young, judge); 2017 Autumn House Poetry Prize (Kimoko Hahn, judge), 2017 Shelterbelt Poetry Prize (Ada Limón, judge); Vassar Miller Prize (2017, Rosanna Warren, judge; 2016, AE Stallings, judge; 2015, Geoffrey Brock, judge; 2011, Lisa Russ Spaar, judge; 2010, J.D. McClatchy, judge); 2014 Kore Press Open Reading; and 2013 Philip Levine Poetry Book Prize (Philip Levine, judge)



  • Fellowships: the Center for Book Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and the Prague Summer Program

Upcoming Events

Books

We Call Them Beautiful

We Call Them Beautiful

Rejoice all lovers of the word for the generous, gorgeous, and timely gathering that is KC Trommer's We Call Them Beautiful. The world needs these poems right now for they are fostered alike by Beauty and by Dread and they do what only real poems can: they leave us changed. We come away from reading them somehow feeling like the recipients of a benediction that makes us more merciful, more tender towards the world, towards ourselves.

Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate of Jamaica


KC Trommer’s brave debut explores the power in doing: seeing, naming. touching, marveling, grieving. Some of the most heart-wrenching poems in We Call Them Beautiful explore divorce—the rage, alienation, and disappointment. As Trommer writes, “Now is a matter of thinking of what tense / I choose to know you in.” As these poems wisely suggest, past, present, and future are all imperfect, but there is a hopeful courage in the voice: “Wherever I go, I am this woman.” This woman—this poet—is a force.
Maggie Smith, author of Good Bones


To be “broken and mended, broken and mended,” the poet, KC Trommer, writes for all of us, as she fearlessly and poetically confronts the corrosion—and tender maternity—of love’s scarred and unfathomable existence.

Emily Fragos, author of St. Torch


Assured and masterful in its compassion, KC Trommer’s poetry is a salvage and positively shimmering balm, always open to the quite miraculous, the delicate negotiations in realms of home, heartbreak, the Cape and city blocks, layers of subways and museum havens. If you are like me, repeating to myself her turns of capture and release, you will find these lines etched long in memory: these poems are a net of light, piece-by-piece bringing up the best in all of us and unmistakably making the day sing.
Douglas A. Martin, author of Acker

Among KC Trommer’s poems, one finds emergences, tests of bravery, and dollops of trust. Her poem’s utterances—sometimes turning on display, sometimes mercurially floating in a consuming element . . . sometimes nervous peerage into traps, sometimes celebrations of the security of confederation—are always a suspension of self-possession; hers are songs of the unrepressed and the eternal.
Scott Hightower, author of Self-evident

Twitter Logo.png
Facebook Logo.png
Instagram Logo.png

© 2020 Diode Editions